The Backwards (but not uncommon) Approach to Obtaining a Publisher

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Looking for a publisher? Many authors are looking for that partnership that will help them build their audience to a greater level. The most common scenario I find with many authors looking for help goes something like this:
 
Author: I've already written my book and self-published it, but I only sold a few copies. Can you help me secure a publisher? I need help getting it into bookstores and broader distribution.
 
Me: So where and how have you promoted the book?
 
Author: Amazon and Facebook. I've sold a couple of hundred copies, but it has lost momentum. I need to get a publisher to get the book out there for me.
 
Me: It's an uphill climb at this point. You've done the process backwards.
 
Does that fit your scenario or someone you know? If there was ever a day that you could self-publish and self-promote your book successfully, this is it. There are so many tools available to writers in which they can get their message out and have their voice heard, if you are willing to do the work. And actually sometimes that is your best, most profitable solution...as long as you do it right. Unfortunately, once you go this route and are unsuccessful, your chances of securing a publisher reduce significantly for several reasons:
  
1. You've told the publisher your platform is small and you are unable to create momentum for your own book. If the author can't create momentum, then why should a publisher take that risk? All publishers are hoping for an author that will bring a significant audience with them. If you DON'T have that audience then you have to have other incentives that you bring to the table. 
 
2. Once a book has been self-published and an ISBN assigned, the book is no longer considered "new". So in essence you are asking the publisher to take a used product. In addition, they feel that you have already "scooped" the primary sales off the top....even if your numbers aren't large.
 
3. If we are successful in getting the attention of a publisher under these conditions, because of some unique element in your book, they will almost always change the title and cover so they have a "new" product. Are you able to live with that decision? Many authors are not. (Note: Even if you submit your book to a publisher first, the chances are high that the title or sub-title you have attached to your manuscript will get changed. It's best not to get too attached.)
 
So still looking for a publisher?
 
Have you done all the steps backward? While it's not impossible to get a publisher on board at this point, as I stated before,  it's now an uphill climb. However, there are steps you can take, that if done right, can still turn the situation around. But they do take work. Because if you can't sell your own book, chances are the publisher won't be very successful either unless you give them some tools to work with.
 
So want to know more about those tools and how to apply them to your situation? Message me at karen@prioritypr.org or 918.943.0515